Posting pictures prove problematic

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Think about this: A student that you sit next to in school is one of the smartest people you have met. The student comes home from school and is expected to do homework right away.

Instead of doing homework, the student decides to take a picture with hardly any clothes on and posts it on their vsco thinking nobody will judge or have a snarky remark about it. That student that you thought was so smart is not as smart as you thought they were.

WHAT. WOULD. MAKE. THEM. THINK. TO. POST. THIS?

Employers like to make sure you are a good person for the occupation and they cannot do that when you are posting pictures of yourself half naked.

Visualize what it would be like sitting in a room at Children’s Hospital, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, being interviewed for a job opening and the employer pulls up your Instagram or VSCO.

First thing they’re going to do is feel very uncomfortable, probably give you a couple disgusted or surprised glares.

Why? Because nobody wants to see your disguised, hidden face and your half naked chest.  Especially your future boss.

Seeing inappropriate pictures or questionable content of you is a sure fire way to lose the opportunity of a lifetime.

You think it’s bad when you get busted by your mom or dad when they find things on your phone.  You can imagine the disgust on their faces when she finds out you are doing far more than watching vines. And now your boss knows that too.

CNN found that social media, including Instagram, is “becoming the latest way for people to get offers rescinded, reprimanded at work and even fired”. Also, the Aggie states, “if you are reaching for a marketing position and dealing with a company’s social media they might ask for an in-depth look at yours”. So to all of you who post profound pictures, you should think twice.

Time.com provided research stating “55% [of employers] have reconsidered a candidate based on what they find, with most (61%) of those double-takes being negative”.

The Aggie states that “pictures of underage drinking, complaints about past jobs or anything of the sort can be enough to cause even a perfect resume to be tossed aside”.

The point?

Your future boss does not want to see your bootylicious bum on his feed as soon as he checks Instagram in the morning. He doesn’t need to know what kind of underwear you were wearing and if you think it matched your outfit. Okay, that’s great, you match, but really? He doesn’t care that much about your bum.

Posting pictures that expose yourself in provocative ways, it shows that you have little respect for yourself. Is that really the impression you are trying to make?   I certainly hope not.

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Posting pictures prove problematic